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Articles About The Chronicles of Narnia Movies, beginning with The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe and Continuing With Prince Caspian

The Official Prince Caspian Trailer

Posted by The Editor on 02/07 at 08:45 PM
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Character List For The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe
Cast of Characters.

Aslan: The creator / ruler of Narnia, who appears as a Lion. Also known as the Singer, the High King above All High Kings, Lord of the Whole Wood. If The Chronicles of Narnia are a Christian Allegory, then Aslan is the Christ figure.

Mr. and Mrs. Beaver: Talking creatures of the forest who shelter the Pevensie children and take them to Aslan.

Boggles: Demon servants of the White Witch.

Buffins: Giants

Cruels: Demon servants of the White Witch.

Daughters of Eve: The term used in the prophecy for human females.

Dryads: Wood spirits / nymphs

Efreets: Demon servants of the White Witch.

The Emperor Over The Sea: He doesn’t make an appearance in the books, but he is Aslan’s father and the ultimate ruler of Narnia.  In a Christian context, he is God The Father.

Ettins: Evil Giant servants of the White Witch

Father Christmas: Santa Claus figure who gives gifts to the Pevensie children to aid them in their struggle against the witch.

Ghouls: Flesh eating servants of the White Witch.

Hags: Ancient witch servants of the White Witch. They tie Aslan to the Stone Table.

Horrors: Demon servants of the White Witch.

Incubuses: Demon servants of the White Witch

Jadis: The White Witch. She makes her first appearance in The Magician’s Nephew. Jadis is immortal because she she at a magic apple. Jadis tempts Edmund and corrupts him.

Digory Kirke: Digory makes his first appearance in the Magician’s Nephew. The Pevensie children are sent to live with him to escape the London Blitz, and it is in his home that they discover the Wardrobe.

Mrs. Macready: Professor Digory’s housekeeper.

Edmund Pevensie: Younger of the two Pevensie boys. He is the second to travel to Narnia and later betrays his siblings to the White Witch. He is claimed by the Witch, but is redeemed by Aslan’s sacrifice.

Lucy Pevensie: Youngest of the Pevensie children. She is the first to discover Narnia and the most consistently faithful to Aslan.

Peter Pevensie: Oldest of the Pevensie children. He is named High King by Aslan.

Susan Pevensie: Oldest of the two Pevensie girls. Susan is witness to Aslan’s death and resurrection.

Maugrim: The wolf who serves as the Captain of the White Witch’s secret police. Slain by Peter.

Minotaur: A man with the head of a bull. Servants of the White Witch.

Orknies: Servants of the White Witch

People of the Toadstools: Toadies of the White Witch

Rhindon: Peter’s sword. In true fantasy tradition, all swords have names.

Spectres: Ghostly servants of the White Witch.

Sprites: Servants of the White Witch

Mr. Tumnus: A faun who befriends Lucy. He is punished for doing so by The White Witch.

The White Witch: See Jadis

Posted by The Editor on 02/07 at 07:45 PM
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Christian Themes In The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe

Christian Themes In The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

Although it is possible to read the Chronicles of Narnia as pure adventures, they also are very much grounded in Christian themes. Lewis seems to have intended The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe as a more accessible (for children) version of the Easter story.

Aslan, the Lion who sang Narnia into being in The Magician’s Nephew, clearly is a Christ-like figure. In The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, he returns to the world he created to redeem it from the eternal winter of the White Witch.

The witch is an evil figure, who tempts Edmund, one of the prophesied “Sons of Adam,” and turns him against the other “Sons of Adam and Daughters of Eve” and against Aslan himself. Here, we have a parallel to to mankind turning from the Word of God.

Aslan defeats the Witch’s winter, but she has one last trick up her sleeve. She claims Edmund, saying that Deep Magic From The Dawn of Time has given her dominion over such traitors. Only blood will save the boy, so Aslan secretly agrees to be sacrificed by the Witch. His death, however, is only temporary, because Deeper Magic from Before the Dawn of Time guarantees that the wrongly sacrified will be brought back to life. The morning after his sacrifice, Aslan returns to his final victory over the evil witch.

If you remove the fantasy elements, the basic outline is familiar as the Easter story. Other elements of The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe further echo the Easter story of Jesus’ death and resurrection:

Just as Jesus held vigil at Gesthemane with a few trusted disciples, Aslan spends a lonely night before his sacrfice with Lucy and Susan.
Bound and condemned, Aslan is mocked by the White Witch’s followers; Jesus is mocked by Pilate’s soldiers.

When Mary Magdalene and the other women go to the tomb, it is empty, and Jesus’ body is gone. Later, the women are the first to see him after the resurrection. Similarly, in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, when Lucy and Susan go back to the table to find Aslan’s body, it is gone; they, too, are the first to see Aslan after his resurrection.

Posted by The Editor on 02/07 at 07:39 PM
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